5 steps for Anti-hunting training for dogs

Anti-hunting training for dogs

A lot of dog breeds were originally bred for hunting, but today the hunting instinct can quickly become a problem. If your dog runs after every rabbit or bird and forgets all commands, it can have dangerous consequences. But can you reduce a dog’s hunting instinct? When is it time to intervene and how does anti-hunting training for dogs work?

If your dog suddenly becomes uncontrollable

Whether it’s a deer, rabbit, bird, or is the neighbor’s cat, some dogs will chase anything that moves. Once the dog has mastered the hunting instinct, waving wildly, shouting loudly, yelling, or whistling to call it back are often useless. The daily walk with your beloved four-legged friend becomes a real obstacle course when your dog’s hunting behavior can no longer be kept. The dog does not only endanger its prey but also itself and other road users. Your dog may be running into a very busy state in the rush of the moment. And even if the wild animal was not made a prey, it can still suffer the consequences for a long time. For example, if it has become tired and a mother animal can no longer take care of her young.

Anti-hunting training for dogs

Also, Read Our Article: Understanding and Raising Aggressive Dogs

back to menu ↑

Does every dog ​​have a hunting instinct?

A lot of dogs can run like mad at the smell alone, while other dogs must first have seen an animal before the hunting instinct takes over. Still, other dogs don’t care about a passing rabbit. Whatever type of dog your dog is, the tendency to chase is genetic. Dogs owe the hunting instinct to their ancestors, the wolves. Our trained dogs no longer need this instinct to get food, but the impulse to hunt is still there. If your dog often runs away like a madman, anti-hunting training for dogs can help.

back to menu ↑

Depending on the dog breed

How strong that impulse also depends on the breed. For example, there are varieties, such as the beagle, german shorthair, Dachshund, Weimaraner, Terrier, Basset Hound, and many more that were bred specifically for hunting. This is how specialized hunting dogs came into being for the drift, stalking, catching, or packing of game. In other breeds, on the other hand, the hunting instinct was increasingly pushed into the background. The varieties golden retriever, boxer, Maltese andPugs are today considered real family dogs that are primarily known for their good social behavior.

Anti-hunting training for dogs

back to menu ↑

Other Yacht Drive Triggers

How quickly your dog’s hunting instinct is activated is also genetically determined. However, other factors can also increase the incentive to hunt. For example, even dogs that have never hunted before suddenly run after a wild animal and seem to have forgotten their upbringing from one moment to the next. The tricky part is that once dogs have hunted, they display this behavior over and over again. When walking several dogs, it is often enough if one dog in the group feels the instinct to incite all the others to hunt. In this case, it is also referred to as a mood transfer. Hormone changes, an altered sexual behavior of the dog, can also influence the hunting instinct.

back to menu ↑

Why is the hunting instinct so difficult to control?

It doesn’t matter what breed your dog is, the hunting instinct can always arise. Owners of young dogs, which are not real hunting dogs, are of course shocked when their previously good four-legged friend suddenly runs off. Once the dog has started the persecution, it can hardly be stopped. But why is the hunting instinct so strong that the dog no longer listens to the owner? The reason for that is happiness hormones. When hunting, the dog’s body releases endorphins. This gives the dog a feeling of happiness. To generate this feeling, it is usually enough to just run after the game. So the dogs don’t need a successful hunt for this intoxication. The reward, in this case, is twice as great, but the drive alone is enough reward for many dogs thanks to the hormones released.

Our Articles you may love to Read...

Related Topics

My Dog Shoppe