Bavarian Mountain Hound Dog Breed Information

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The Bavarian Mountain Hound is a purebred dog that originated in Germany. These puppies are loyal, intelligent and reserved which are some of the best traits for a gundog breed.

Bavarian Mountain Scent Hound is also referred to by a few other names, including Bavarian Mountain Scent Hound and Bayerischer Gebirgsschwei. Despite being a very rare breed, you can find these adorable doggies at local shelters or breed-specific rescue centers. So remember to adopt! Don’t shop!

These reserved pups are very loyal to their house parents and would be a great fit for families with children or larger households. They are a quiet breed, but they are very wary of strangers or people they don’t know who approach them or their people. If you want a loyal pup who likes to be active and loves you unconditionally, the Bavarian Mountain Hound might just be the dog for you!

Look below for all the dog breed traits and facts about the Bavarian Mountain Hound!

More about this breed

Characteristics

  • The main colors of the Bavarian Mountain Hounds are brindle, reddish brown or tan. Sometimes they come in fawn, which is a light yellow or tan color that can range from pale to dark red.
  • The coat of the Bavarian Mountain Hounds is dense and close to their bodies, lying very flat against it. They are not considered a good choice for allergy sufferers.
  • Because they tend to have a shorter coat, the Bavarian Mountain Hounds are not particularly suited to extreme weather conditions.
  • Bavarian Mountain Hounds get along well with children of all ages, but it’s best that they are around people who know how to handle and play with them gently.
  • Separation anxiety can be a problem if they are left alone for long periods of time. Bavarian Mountain Hounds are best suited for large families or families with children

History

In the 19th century, the Germans had German Bracken hunting dogs to help them track down game. They were considered dogs with a highly developed sense of smell that helped hunters follow scents and tracks of their prey. It is from the German ferns that the Bavarian Mountain Scent Hound was bred.

Due to the mountainous areas of Germany where many hunters searched for game, the Hanoverian scent hound was too large and heavy for the terrain. The Bavarian Scent Hound was lighter, more agile, and able to keep up with the big game and prey hunted by hunters.

 

The United Kennel Club (UKC) recognized the breed of Bavarian Mountain Hounds in 1996, although it would be another 20 years before the American Kennel Club (AKC) included the breed in its Foundation Stock Service in 2016.

The Bavarian Mountain Scent Hound Society of America formed a year later in 2017 to protect and promote dogs of this breed.

Although they are a rare breed, some have ended up in shelters or in the care of rescue groups. Consider adoption if you decide this is the breed for you.

Check your local shelters, look for Bavarian Mountain Scent Hound rescues, and give these adorable doggies a loving home.

Size

Because the Bavarian Scent Hound is a rare breed, there are a few standards when it comes to their size. That said, as hunting dogs, you can expect the Bavarian Mountain Hounds to be on the medium to large size side.

Most weigh 44 to 55 pounds and range in height from 17 to 20 inches at the shoulder. That said, many can be smaller or larger.

Personality

The Bavarian Mountain Hound is a very reserved and intelligent breed of dog. They are medium sized dogs that like to be active and would do well in a large yard where they can run and play games with their owner. They are very loyal to their people and will do anything to please them. Due to their high energy and agility, they prefer to play rather than snuggle indoors.

Most Bavarian Mountain Hounds have a prey drive, as they were originally bred to hunt game. They are not watchdogs and they are fairly quiet pups, but they are still wary of strangers or anyone new to them. That said, they are not aggressive towards humans. They also get along well with other dogs.

These dogs do best with early training and socialization to get along well with other people and dogs. They are intelligent but need physical and mental stimulation or they will get bored easily.

They also tend to bond with their human family or household quite easily and separation anxiety can be a problem if left alone for a long time. Bavarian Mountain Hounds are best suited to large families or families with children, as they demand attention and love.

Health

The Bavarian Scent Hound is a fairly healthy dog ​​breed, but can be predisposed to the same conditions as most gundog breeds. While most are generally healthy, some can be prone to a few health problems which is why it’s important to take good care of them and have them checked regularly by the vet.

Some of the most common health problems in Bavarian Mountain Scent Hounds include:

  • musculoskeletal problems such as hip and elbow dysplasia
  • eye problems such as progressive retinal atrophy and entropion

Care

As with all dogs, you should have your Bavarian Mountain Hound checked by the vet on a regular basis to detect any health problems early on. Your vet can help you develop a grooming routine that will keep your dog healthy.

If the Bavarian Mountain Hound does not get the exercise he needs, he may gain weight despite his high energy. Make sure your dog gets a good walk for at least an hour a day, with a few good, active play sessions and shorter walks in between if possible.

Check the ears daily for dirt and pests and clean them as recommended by your vet. Trim your dog’s nails before they get too long – usually once or twice a month. They should not click against the floor. Your groomer can help you with this.

Also pay attention to the oral hygiene of your Bavarian Mountain Hound. You should brush their teeth daily as they can develop dental problems if you don’t give them attention. Your vet can teach you how to properly brush your dog’s teeth.

Nutrition

An ideal diet for the Bavarian Mountain Hound should be tailored to a medium-sized breed with a lot of energy. If not given the necessary exercise or nutrition, these puppies will eventually gain weight, so you should stick to a regular feeding schedule and not leave food out during the day. Also limit the number of treats.

As with all dogs, the Bavarian Mountain Hound’s nutritional needs will change from puppy to adulthood and will continue to change until they get older. You should ask your vet for recommendations on your Bavarian Mountain Hound’s diet, as there is far too much variation between individual dogs – including weight, energy and health – to make a specific recommendation.

Coat color and coat care

The main colors of the Bavarian Mountain Hounds are brindle, reddish brown or tawny. Sometimes they come in fawn, which is a light yellow or tan color that can range from pale to dark red.

The coat of the Bavarian Mountain Hound is dense and close to their body, lying very flat against it. The coat can be short, thick, and not overly shiny. They are not considered a good choice for allergy sufferers. These adorable puppies are easy to care for. A good brushing once a week will probably suffice.

Because they tend to have a shorter coat, Bavarian Mountain Scent Hounds are not particularly suited to extreme weather conditions.

Children and other pets

The Bavarian Mountain Hounds get along well with children of all ages, but it is best that they are around people who know how to handle and play with them gently. That said, for children early learning how to properly approach and play with a medium-sized dog, the Bavarian Mountain Hound can be a wonderful, active companion.

When it comes to other pets, the Bavarian Mountain Hound gets along well with other animals if introduced slowly and calmly, and early socialization will help make this run smoothly. It is best if they get used to other pets early on. That said, Bavarian Mountain Hounds are not naturally fond of animals or pets that are smaller than themselves.

Still, many Bavarian Mountain Hounds get along well with other dogs and children, so it really comes down to training, socialization, and the good fortune of fate.

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